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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the election. >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for thursday, november 1, 2012. >>> good morning. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. recovery is slow going for millions of people affected by sandy and the superstorm is not done yet. storm remnants triggered flood watch warnings from northern new england and mid-atlantic states. winter storm warnings for central appalachians and flooding advisories across the lower great lakes. 74 people have been killed by the mega storm at one point. 60 million people were without power. it's fallen to 40 million people. and 6 million homes and businesses. and back up batteries and generators are failing knocking out one in five cell phone towers. here's a timeline video of how some 650,000 new yorkers lost power. the storm rolled in. you see the freedom tower on the right. night falls. the substation explodes. lower manhattan is plunged into darkness. mayor bloomberg said could it be days before power is restored. >> reporter: good morning. i'm standing in front of the entrance to new york's fdr drive. this is one of the areas that remains flood
>>> good morning. it is friday, november 2, 2012. welcome to "cbs this morning". >>> gas shortages, power outages, traffic nightmares. tensions begin to boil over in the wake of hurricane sandy. >>> with four days to go until the election, could day's jobs report be a game-changer? >> john dickerson will take us through the road map to victory for each candidate. >>> we begin with today's "eye opener" your world in 90 seconds. >> red cross should have been here. there should -- i have someone coming. >> anger, fear and frustration grow as millions spend another night in the dark. >> we could have died! we couldn't breathe! >> the misery on staten island is being felt by residents in new york and new jersey. >> we have no surprise. our kids are homeless. they're cold. >> millions still have no power. long lines for the little gas that's left. >> it's a dog fight out here. >> this is like pre-apocalyptic scenarios, you know. >> would you like to see inside? >> what does it look like in there? >> pretty awful. >> if you vote for me, we'll win this election. we'll keep moving forward.
there are two other guys the police would like to catch, as well. cbs 5 reporter anne makovec in san francisco with more. >> reporter: good morning. one suspect down two to go. police in san francisco are hoping that the public will help them once again find the people responsible for torching a muni bus. police trying to identify these two people who set the bus on fire sunday night by throwing things that were on fire into the bus. it was 12:30 a.m. on monday right after the big giants celebration on market and 3rd street. now, this is cell phone video with pictures of the two arson suspects. police hope someone recognizes these two and turns them in. >> we will identify you, arrest you, prosecute you and you're going to pay for it. so don't go there. >> this vandalism suspect was identified this week as 22-year- old gregory tyler graniss. his picture was circulated on social media sites. it was shared 18,000 times. and this is his mugshot. he is facing felony charges of vandalism and injuring or destroying a passenger transit vehicle. people say it was the mob mentality that caused people t
a bus burning a few nights ago. cbs 5 reporter anne makovec with how social media led them to another vandalism suspectly. suspect and police hope to catch two more. >> reporter: you know with the invention of the cell phone everything is an amateur videographer these days and now police are hoping that the product of that the cell phone video people take will turn the masses into amateur detectives. check out this cell phone video police just released showing an event that happened early monday morning around 12:30 a.m. after the giants won the world series on sunday night. it's in slow motion. you can see guys throwing something burning into the muni bus. windshield is already smashed. this again was taken at 12:30 on monday morning at market and third streets. police say they have already arrested this guy after this picture was taken by the "san francisco chronicle" then widely circulated on social media sites. >> you make the front page of the paper, your goose is cooked. >> reporter: here is that suspect mugshot 22-year-old gregory tyler graniss of san francisco now facing felon
medical correspondent with the cbs evening news with scott pelley. >> we like to stay away from the word miracle, we really do. that's an overused word. i will say when i got there that night, i had the feeling at the pit of my stomach at first when i walked in, i thought oh my, this isn't a movie. we don't know how this is going to end. this could end with death. there were no deaths as far as we know of anybody or catastrophes. >> rose: finally this evening we change courses and turn to narco terrorism in mexico and talk about that with mexico's secretary of the interior alejandro poire. >> mexico has been moving forward very significantly. of course we're very worried about the violence and security but in many areas and we can talk about them at length, mexico has made very significant advances. >> rose: the aftermath of hurricane sandy, extraordinary evacuation from a hospital and conversation with a secretary of the interior of mexico when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: it has been three
, by the way. >> yes. >> it deserves the applause. >> and it was -- i was looking a lot at the history of cbs and nbc, the big two, but abc has started coming on strong and it became the third of the big three. how did abc news did on parity with nbc and cbs? what is the timeframe that that happened? >> abc news to everyone always says it was the fourth that of three. [laughter] for the 60's and 70's. it was a very weak news organization by all accounts. let's be clear. abc does the weakest of the networks as well. if you recall, there were to nbc network and nbc had a spinoff because they had trust concerns. so letter golden sun started building up the entertainment part of abc and to some degree successfully in the 60's and 70's. he concluded the only way to really get to parity with cbs and nbc was to build a great news organization, not so much because he loved news, but because the local stations made most of their money, as they do today, off of their newscast. he needed to improve. so he turned to abc sports, monday night football, while the world's ports and it said, you go over to ne
. this is cbs news. calling the election and retracting to remind you what happened 12 years ago. [video clip] >> let's point out the television and radio networks using a pool of data exit poll information have made some mistakes over the night. it the big one being in florida, first calling it for al gore and then calling in for bush and then calling it back. the television and radio networks are not the only ones who had to take some calls back. >> i have one newspaper, this is "the new york post." they called it for george bush. just like the networks, they came out with a new edition, they called it "a nail biter." when it happened to us, it was based on technology. this is kind of scary what we are basing it all on tonight. >> they may yet be right. in the case of the chicago newspaper, there were wrong. it still could be right, but they pulled back. >> in fairness to al gore making his concession phone call, he was probably listening to us. >> no doubt about it. it is 260 al gore, with 270 needed to win. florida's electoral votes. the reason florida is in white is because if this stat
election night -- or maybe we should say election morning 12 years ago -- let's go back to cbs news's coverage of the race between george bush and al gore. >> let's point out what the television networks are using a pool of data and exit poll of permission and other ever mission have made some mistakes over the night, the big one meeting in florida, first calling it for al gore and then for george bush and calling it back. television and radio networks are not the only ones who had to take some calls. >> this is one that called it for bush. they came out with a new addition, they called it a nail biter. when it -- it was a hunch. when it happened to us, it was based on technology. it is kind of scary what we are basing this on tonight. >> they may yet be right to enter the case of the chicago tribune, and they were wrong but. it still could be right. they pulled a back. >> a denture fairness to our core, he was probably listening to us. >> he and his people. no doubt about it. florida's electoral votes, look at the map. the reason florida is and why it is because this state remains
the reporters for their questions and the cbs network. i very much appreciate it. look, this is a big election. and it's a big election for a number of reasons. but from my perspective as a montanaen one of the most important reasons is because we're back in 1912. we've come back to a time when appropriations can give unlimited amounts of money, secret money and influence the political structure of this country. and that's scary for a democracy. we've seen incredible sums of money come into this state this cycle since the citizens united decision money that has no transparency whatsoever. money that is being used to define me as something that i'm not because quite frankly they cannot beat the farmer from big sandy with the record that i have for veterans for sportsmen for women for education for tax policy for making sure that montana's rural perspective is front and center in washington, d.c. look, over the last six years i've had an incredible opportunity to work with some of the most incredible people in the world and they all live right in this state. when i first got appointed to the vet
schieffer of cbs news. the questions are mine, and i have not shared them with the candidates or their aides. the audience has taken a vow of silence -- no applause, no reaction of any kind except right now when we welcome president barack obama and governor mitt romney. gentlemen, your campaigns have agreed to certain rules and they are simple. they have asked me to divide the evening into segments. i'll pose a question at the beginning of each segment. you will each have two minutes to respond, and then we will have a general discussion until we move to the next segment. tonight's debate, as both of your know, comes on the 50th anniversary of the night that president kennedy told the world that the soviet union had installed nuclear missiles in cuba -- perhaps the closest we've ever come to nuclear war. and it is a sobering reminder that every president faces at some point an unexpected threat to our national security from abroad. so let's begin. the first segment is the challenge of a changing middle east and the new face of terrorism. i'm going to put this into two segments, so you'll ha
as well as operating -- cbs "newshour" past -- [inaudible] >> "don't ask don't tell," the elimination of the "don't ask don't tell" we are a year into this so i don't want to abstain it but it could not have gone any better than it has gone. i think it has to do first with how we rolled it out, how we briefed it and frankly we underestimated our younger populations and their ability, their acceptability of this issue. in my mind, so far it really could not have gone any better. there are still some things we have to work through but it has gone very well. in terms of our recruiting, i always caveat this because it has a lot to do with our economic and unemployment that the last two years up in the highest quality of recruits the army has said that i can remember. in terms of educational levels and in terms of waivers we have granted him a party recruited 30,000 for next year. which is half of our requirement. it's already done. there are people -- when the economy changes could impact us? c.'s, but right now it is not impacted our recruiting and it is does not impact their quality ope
in the corpus area, and he won after a runoff by about 800 or 900 votes. >> cb solomon of -- solomon ortiz senior. >> that's exactly right. yes. but he arrived because first he was inexperienced in the ways of governance or politics at large. he arrives three and half weeks after everybody else did because of the recount, and so i followed a lot of these congressman around to get a sense of the irrational experience, and his was one of the kind of citizen politicians to try as you might can never quite catch up. always just sort of, you know, holding on to the medicine ball for dear life and never kind of getting a top of it. he was -- i mean, he told me he had this recurring nightmare that he was alone in his office and there was no furniture and only a phone that rang and rang and rang and he was never able to get it. he told a group of business lobbyists. you know you have that anxiety. dreams are really big. you know, that anxiety dream of going to school and looking down and not wearing your pants. you need to be the guys to tell me where my pants. the ones to tell me what things they
on walter cronkite. >> guest: a wonderful book. [applause] >> host: looking at cbs and nbc but abc came on strong and was 1/3 of the big three. how did abc news get on parity? what is the timeframe? >> abc news was the fourth thought of three. [laughter] it was very weak by all accounts. there were two nbc networks they had to spin off one but they started to build up the entertainment part. he concluded the only way to get to parity was to build a great news organization because the local stations made most of their money. so who created wide world of sports and the modern olympics said spend as much money as you want, which he did. [laughter] he built it up starting 1977 through the '80s by bringing in big stars. david brinkley, diane sawyer , ted koppel, he brought peter from overseas. he had barbara walters already. amazing graphics and was very aggressive. he built it up to a powerhouse. >> what was his personality like? >> guest: he was 18 yes. not in his demeanor. he was on the shy side and totally absent he never returned phone calls of anybody. at night you have a crisis there
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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